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slo

Page history last edited by abogado 9 years, 11 months ago

PLOS

 

Student Learning Outcomes & Assessment

 

law1-slo law2-slo law10-slo law11-slo law12-slo law13-slo
law16-slo law17-slo law18-slo law19-slo law20-slo law34-slo

 ** legal research papers required in Law 17 and 34 and optional in all other classes


Student Learning Outcomes

 

Upon successful completion of each law class, a student will be able to:

1. Brief law cases in the subject and content area of the particular course or class including the relevant topics covered in the class.  

2. Critically analyze and argue issues of  the subject and content area of the particular class  including the relevant topics covered in the class. 

3. Prepare legal documents, forms or papers related to the subject matter and content of the particular class.  

 

Students will read contract  cases and write a case brief demonstrating their understanding and application of the essential facts and rules of law and legal principles of the case. see case brief rubric at http://missionparalegal.pbworks.com/briefing
 

 

Criteria for Case Briefs

Students will read evidence cases and write a case brief demonstrating their understanding and application of the essential facts and rules of law and legal principles of the case. see case brief rubric at http://missionparalegal.pbworks.com/briefing

Criteria: The “case brief” will achieve an “acceptable” or higher rating, and will be indicative of a paralegal who is competent to work in a law office, state agency or with the courts.

Students will read a court case and write a “case brief” using the FIRACT method of case briefing (“Facts, Issue, Rule, Application and Conclusion”).

The assessment will be evaluated using the following rating scale:

(4) – Superior - comprehensive, very accurate, analytical, sophisticated logic, incisive, persuasive discussion of the facts, issues, rules, rationale, holdings, applications, and conclusions (Facts, Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion, Take Home Message - "FIRACT" method)

(3) – Strong - generally convincing, sufficiently analytical and logical, covers well all of the parts of the FIRACT method for a case brief.

(2) – Acceptable – basic understanding, reasonable, unsophisticated but shows comprehension of the case and legal points, lacking mastery but still in control, limited scope, occasionally original, misses parts of the FIRACT method for a case brief.

(1) – Unacceptable - superficial, lacking understanding, non-academic, undigested, unfinished, missing the target, perfunctory, inappropriate to the assignment, poorly developed, does not follow FIRACT method for a case brief.


CASE BRIEF - GRADING RUBRIC

 

Outstanding

A

Proficient

B

Adequate

C

Inadequate

D/F

Case Name and Citation

 

Complete case name and properly formatted citation appear at the top of the case brief

Complete case name is provided but citation is incomplete

Complete case name is provided but no citation is give

Neither the case name nor the citation appears at the top of the case brief OR both case name and citation are incorrect.

Operative Facts

 

Operative facts are relevant to the issue being examined by the court and are logically organized.   

Facts are relevant to the question being answered but lack coherence or organization. 

Irrelevant facts are included.  Lack of logical organization.  

Relevant facts are omitted or lost in discussion of unrelated information.   

Procedural Facts

 

Procedural history of the case is clearly and logically presented in proper chronology.

Procedural history of the case is presented but chronology is confusing.

Some procedural history is presented.

No procedural history is presented.

Issue/Short Answer

 

Includes all elements (applicable law, issue being examined and relevant facts) in a well crafted, grammatically correct question.

Answer responds to question being posed.

Issue is separately articulated, but does not include all elements; applicable law, issue being examined and relevant facts.

Answer responds to question being posed.

Issue is not separately articulated, but implied through description of facts or discussion of law.

Answer does not respond to question being posed.

Issue is not articulated

 

No answer is given.

Law

 

Law is correct and is relevant to the question being answered.  Rule(s) of law succinctly paraphrased rather than quoted. 

Law is correct and is relevant to the question being answered, but is not paraphrased

Rules of law are used in providing answer, but it is unclear if writer understands the law and is properly applying it.

Rules of law are omitted from answer or incorrect law is used.

Rationale

 

The court’s reasoning is presented in a clear and logical fashion, leading the reader to an understanding of the rationale behind the law. 

Law is applied to the facts, but the underlying rationale is not clear.  

Analysis is unclear, causing the reader to question whether the law is correct. 

 

No analysis of the law is given.

Writing Mechanics

Sentence structure, grammar, punctuation are substantially correct.

Each component‘s material is logically organized and presented in a clear, concise manner.

Sentence structure, grammar, punctuation are substantially correct.

Organization is logical but needs better consistency and clarity.

Adherence to rules of writing is poor.

Material lacks organization and/or is unclear, making it difficult to understand.

Rules of writing are ignored or misunderstood.

No apparent logic to the organization of the material.  Writing lacks clarity.

 

**above adopted from case grading rubric - AAFPE.org website

 

Research and Writing Papers

 

Students will prepare a final legal research and writing paper (In Law 17 and Law 34) and will use the following format - http://profjordan.pbworks.com/format

 

Final Paper Grading Rubric

The final papers will be graded using the following grading rubric
http://missionparalegal.pbworks.com/rubric-finalpaper

The A Paper

* Provides a cohesive and well argued "thesis"

* Incorporates pertinent and detailed information from the five (5) court cases or codes provided in the paper

* Maintains focus & avoids being sidetracked by tangents

* Presents all information clearly and concisely and in an organized manner

* Does much more than merely restate the thesis and offer a brief response

* Avoids distracting grammar/spelling/etc. problems

· Very well written with sound grammar and spelling

· Paper has clear introductory thesis and effective topic sentences

· Demonstrates creativity

· Provides at least 5 court cases or codes

· Analyzes issues and advances an argument throughout the paper 


 

The B Paper

· Good writing skills, some grammatical/spelling mistakes

· Has an overall theme, but the arguments and evidence are not so sophisticated

· Reasonably well structured but introductory thesis and topic sentences less clear

· Answers all questions from the assignment, but lacks some critical reflection

· Draws upon at least 5 court cases or codes, citing them effectively and properly using case citation format.


 

The C Paper

· Mediocre writing skills, evident grammatical and spelling mistakes

· Lacks an overall theme

· Poorly structured with no evident introductory thesis and topic sentences

· Lacks critical reflection and/or arguments not entirely clear

· Answers most questions from the assignment but not all

· Description of cases or codes lack details, few mentioned specifically

· Poor integration of legal materials and readings

· Draws upon at least 5 cases, citing them effectively and properly using case citation format.


 

The D paper

· Very poorly structured with no evident introductory and concluding statements

· No critical reflection and/or confusing arguments

· Very poor writing skills, replete with grammatical and spelling mistakes

· Completely lacks integration

· Does not have a thesis and does not mention at least 5 court cases and codes

· Poor description of the court cases or codes, generalities

· Very poor to no integration of source case or code materials and readings or has less than 5 court cases or codes.


 

The F paper

· No critical reflection and/or confusing arguments. Plagiarism!

 

Final Papers will be checked with a Plagiarism Checker, so please DO NOT plagiarize.   Use your own words, and create your own work.


updated: 7/12/11

 

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